Lindell: ‘We can build a whole big old new prison for all the people that were part of the election crime of 2020’

by Laura Ramirez

Photo: Alamy

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell said his new film, “Selection Code,” centered on fraud in electronic voting machines, “is gonna change everything,” adding that politicians who still claim that the election was not stolen “should go to prison,” according to Business Insider.

During his show, The Lindell Report, Lindell teased his upcoming film, “Selection Code,” saying he invited “thousands of podcasters and TV hosts, Radio hosts” to attend the film’s premiere in July.

“Selection Code” focuses on “what’s inside” voting machines used in the 2020 presidential election and sounds alarms regarding cyber threats to our election process, as previously reported.

Lindell insisted that after the film’s release, politicians who still claim there “was no election crime, and that they really are in love with those machines” should “sit behind those melted down prison bars made from those machines.”

“We can build a whole big old new prison for all the people that were part of the election crime of 2020,” the MyPillow CEO added.

Speaking with Business Insider, Lindell said his new film would be released on July 16 through a “historical two-day” world premiere.

“It will show the whole world that we can never, ever, use computers or voting machines in elections again,” Lindell told the outlet.

Since the 2020 election, the MyPillow CEO has worked tirelessly to investigate voting machines and file preliminary injunctions to remove voting machines in certain states.

Lindell announced a second preliminary injunction to remove voting machines in Alabama last month. Previously, a preliminary injunction was filed in Arizona to eliminate digital voting machines before the state’s primary elections.

In April, Lindell told RSBN’s Brian Glenn that preliminary injunctions would be filed throughout the country, including in South Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Colorado, Michigan, and Ohio.

Despite Democrats’ efforts to downplay cyber threats in the election process, the U.S. Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Agency (CISA) also recently warned state election officials that electronic voting machines by Dominion Voting Systems in at least 16 states have serious issues, leaving them vulnerable to hacking.

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