Legal foundation identifies 3.1 million New York voter registrations missing information

by Summer Lane

Photo: Alamy

A new research brief conducted by the Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF) has identified 3.1 million voter registrations in New York that are allegedly missing important information.

According to the report, PILF tracked the total number of registered voters across the country between 2021 and 2022, specifically looking for registrations that did not provide a Social Security number or driver’s license number.

Per their research, ten counties in New York took the cake for having missing information, ranging from 832,613 problematic voter registrations in Nassau County to 622,657 in Queens County.

PILF stated in their report:

“The Help America Vote Act of 2002 (HAVA) requires that voter registration applications ask for PII, such as a Social Security or driver license number. What makes this disclosure from the New York State Board of Elections peculiar is that it appears to be an outlier. Nearly every other state disclosed extremely low missing PII totals with few exceptions.”

For reference, PII refers to “personally identifiable information.” The purpose of PII data is to help “officials keep track of living and local registrants, and, ultimately, when they relocate or die.”

PILF’s full report on their findings in New York

However, PILF’s research in New York is not the only troubling data they have found. According to a report from Just the News, the foundation has filed several lawsuits in the state of Minnesota over duplicated voter registrations across six different counties.

New York State’s voter data has come under suspicion before, as recently as in August, with the revelation of “weaponized voter rolls” from Marly Hornik, the director of New York Citizens Audit, per RSBN. Hornik presented information about “overinflated” and “fake and cloned registrations” in New York. Her data was presented during a special election integrity strategy session in August that was hosted by True the Vote.

Hornik’s information primarily focused on software reportedly used in New York to arrange multiple groups of voter identification numbers, alleging that her organization had identified more than three million “100 percent positively false” registrations and potentially eight million more beyond that.

PILF’s report advised that the Department of Justice is already tasked with “enforcing the provisions of HAVA..” to avoid processing ballots with missing data. The group added that if New York is failing to comply with existing federal law, “then only the Voting Section at DOJ can fix the problem.”

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