Wisconsin takes action to restore confidence in elections ahead of primaries

by Laura Ramirez

Photo: Alamy

The Wisconsin Elections Commission (WEC) is attempting to restore voter confidence ahead of the primary elections as the state continues to deal with serious election fraud questions in the 2020 election.

Wisconsin is among several battleground states dealing with intense election fraud allegations that could have potentially tainted the results of the 2020 presidential election. However, before the state’s primary elections in August and the general election in November, WEC managers seek to restore confidence in how the state conducts its elections.

During a Tuesday news conference, WEC administrator Megan Wolfe said the commission fully supports local election clerks, adding, “Each of our 1,850 municipal and 72 county clerks really do the on-the-ground work of administering elections.”

“The best way to combat misunderstandings about the election process is to provide the facts and to show the public opportunities for them to engage with elections,” Wolfe continued. “There are no locked doors or dark corners in elections, and we want members of the public to get involved.”

The commission’s efforts come after five major cities in the state were hit with lawsuits from the Thomas More Society over illegal drop boxes placed throughout the state during the 2020 election, as previously reported.

In the cities of Madison, Milwaukee, Racine, Kenosha, and Green Bay, drop boxes were positioned for citizens to vote during the Covid-19 pandemic. However, “This so-called ‘Wisconsin Safe Voting Plan,’ involved $8.8 million of private grants to these five cities, to target specific populations to vote,” Thomas More Society Special Counsel Erick Kaarda said.

“It had little, if anything at all to do with keeping voters safe from Covid-19, as it purported to do,” Kaarda added.

An extensive election fraud investigation by Special Counsel Michael Gableman in April revealed similar findings. The 136-page report to the Wisconsin State Assembly showed that Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s $417 million in donations likely influenced the 2020 election.

“In the Zuckerberg 5 cities [Green Bay, Kenosha, Milwaukee, Madison, and Racine], in all of those counties, those nursing homes reported a voting rate of 100 percent, anywhere in between 95 percent and 100 percent,” Gableman said.

Nonetheless, Wolfe explained their strategy to increase confidence in the election process by “ensuring that people have the information they need to understand elections.”

Wisconsin’s primaries are scheduled for Aug. 9.

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