‘I’m not waiting’: Trump reveals new action he’ll take as president

2BKD7KC President Donald J. Trump disembarks Marine One at San Diego International AP Landing Zone Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2019, and is greeted by guests and supporters. President Trump in California

Photo: Alamy

President Trump has indicated that as Commander-in-Chief again, he would take more of a hardline approach to quelling rampant crime and unabashed rioting across America, vowing to give law enforcement their authority again and potentially unleashing the power of the U.S. military, Newsmax reported.

The Associated Press reported that the president stated in Iowa that he was not “waiting” to squash violence in the most problematic cities, noting that while he had stayed his hand during his first term, in a second term, “We don’t have to wait any longer.”

The 45th president has been very clear about his intention to restore law and order to domestic cities and states struggling with rising crime. In September remarks delivered in California, he suggested, “There must be retribution of theft and destruction and the ruination of our country.”

He demonstrated his distaste for the unfettered filthiness in the nation’s capital, slamming Washington, D.C., for being a “s***house” in October. He has proposed bringing D.C. under federal control to get the grime and crime off the streets of the city.

President Trump has also strongly explained another tact of his strategy to lessen crime: go after the drug cartels who are flooding across the unsecured southern border and spiking violence in American communities.

He declared at the onset of 2023 that America would “wage war” on the cartels and vowed to deploy “all necessary military assets, including the U.S. Navy, to impose a full naval embargo on the cartels.”

Legacy outlets have projected that the president may utilize the Insurrection Act during a prospective second term to call up active-duty or reserve military units to suppress domestic turmoil in the worst spots, but this has not been confirmed by any authoritative source.

Per the AP, the act was initially passed in 1792 and is not “reviewable by the courts.”

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